White Hard Maple

Product Pictures

4/4 White Hard Maple F&B 4/4 White Hard Maple Select Narrow 4/4 White Hard Maple 6' Select 7/4 White Hard Maple F&B 12/4 White Hard Maple F&B

White Hard Maple

Acer saccharum

Hard Maple, otherwise known as “Sugar Maple” and “White Maple,” is a heavy hardwood noted for its sturdy bright white sapwood. It is the official state tree of New York State and also the cornerstone of Gutchess Lumber’s New York production.

Product Information

We produce Hard Maple lumber in standard thicknesses from 4/4, 5/4, 6/4, 7/4, 8/4, 10/4, 12/4, and 16/4. Packages are sorted according to National Hardwood Lumber Association rules as F&B or FAS&FAS1F (Face and better) grade, #1 common grade, #2 common grade, and #3 common grade. Narrow selects and short selects are available in 4/4 and 5/4. Sapwood and heartwood color sorts may also be available.

Harvesting Region

Hard Maple grows in the Great Lakes region, northern Appalachia, New England, and Eastern Canada, sometimes in pure stands but often in combination with other hardwoods, especially Northern White Ash or Black Cherry or Yellow Birch. Quality varies over this range. Our Hard Maple comes from preferred areas within about 100 miles (62 km) of our manufacturing facilities. The predominant hardwood in our local forests in New York, the species is rated by NatureServe as secure in its conservation status.


Relative Working & Physical Properties

Hard Maple is one of the hardest and most dense hardwoods. It has high resistance to abrasion and wear. It is prized for fine furniture, cabinets, stairs, mouldings, coffins and flooring. It is used to make basketball courts, bowling alleys, bowling pins, rolling pins and other turnings, skateboard decks, baseball bats, cutting blocks, a variety of musical instruments and cues and shifts of every sort. It machines well, glues satisfactorily and can be stained or polished to a fantastic finish.

  • Specific Gravity0.63
  • Weight705 kg /m3
  • Hardness1450 lbf
  • Machining4
  • Nailing3
  • Screwing3
  • Gluing4
  • Finishing5
What do these numbers mean? Compare hardwood species